10 Smart Ways to Make Money Online

  Last time I wrote about whether or not an intensive workday is a possibility. In follow-up, let’s assume that you have mastered the art of productive batching and single-minded concentration. You are a well-oiled cog in the sea of fast-moving and disparate company body parts. However, you still earn a bum wage. Or you’re an underpaid intern who rallies to the idea of being a Millennial entrepreneur. Or you may even be on the lookout for an additional revenue stream to add to your ever-revolving portfolio. In any case, the fact remains that you want to take advantage of the great unknown and catch a piece of the internet pie for yourself. Many lists detail ideas on how to make money online. It’s a popular subject. So why rehash what has already been stabbed to death many times over? Because I’ve walked around the block hand-in-hand with these online lists. Some of the suggestions work; others belie the point of highly productive online work.     These are 10 SMART ways to make money online:   1. Start your own niche website You have the potential to start your own website for whatever reason. However, in this ever-expanding universe, it makes sense to focus on one particular subject. Transform yourself into that big fish in the small subsection of the pond. Besides, the more tightly-focused your website content, the more relevant the Google Adsense ads you’re going to put on it, and the more likely you’ll convince one of your readers to click on them.   2. Make your own themed Youtube videos Again, we return to the idea of revolving revenue from advertisements. This time, however, you’re not creating a full website from the ether but rather sharing your unique content on...

What Makes You Unique…in 150 Characters or less? Aug28

What Makes You Unique…in 150 Characters or less?

Please raise your hand if you, like me, really dread seeing this question on your job application: “In 150 characters or fewer, tell us what makes you unique. Try to be creative and say something that will catch our eye!” Do you answer in a fun, creative way or go for a concise professional summary? It says to be creative. But I know you’re thinking…what do the recruiters really want to see? I tried to find a good how-to guide when I encountered this 150-character question on the Resumator and Jobvite applications I was sending. And certainly, there are a number of not-so-helpful guides like this one, this one, and possibly this one. To save you time, let me say that I found them pretty useless when it came time to actually write my answer. First, they recommend stunning your audience with a witty and colorful comment. But then they tell how to formulate a 150-character that is professional and very, very boring. So how do you find a good balance between informative and creative? If you follow the formulas recommended in the guides above, your sentence comes out plain and to the point. Which makes you sound like a dried ol’ fart if you write it semi-truthfully… 5-yr assistant brand manager who makes YouTube videos doubles sales through rich media ads Recent business school grad who plays in a jazz quartet knows SAS, SQL, and excels at market analysis …or does it? In actuality, if you have a cool and relevant hobby, you might not need any help in this area. But if you’re normal (or feel like your brain cells have exploded after tweaking your resume too many times), there are ways to improve your “unique” statement.     How to Answer...

The Beginner’s Guide to Personal Branding Jun10

The Beginner’s Guide to Personal Branding

In business school, they talk about personal branding. A lot.In fact, all my professors mentioned it so often that I came away from class thinking the concept was overhyped and somewhat useless. A personal brand, I would scoff, isn’t necessary. My experience and general awesomeness speak for itself. That is, until it doesn’t. Perhaps if you’re a networking genius, C-level exec with a sterling record at the world’s highest grossing companies, personal branding isn’t an issue. But I found out the hard way: when competing with those millions of other job-seekers on online job boards and you’re just an average Joe (or Jane), your marketable presence makes all the difference.     Personal branding is a necessary evil. Or, if you think about those HR reps, a personal brand makes their job a hell of a whole lot easier. What does a brand do? It makes consumer choice more convenient—think about the last time you walked down the cereal aisle at the supermarket, did you reach for a fave brand or stand and antagonize over every colorful box? Brands create a sense of belonging; they evoke experiential and aspirational emotions. You end up loving your brands, and your brands (should) end up loving you, too. And what do you want to convey to a company, client, or investor? The exact same impression.     So how do you go about building a personal brand when you have no idea where to start?   Begin with a personal roadmap strategy: Figure out who you are today. What skills and experiences do you have that make you who you are? What are your strengths and weaknesses? Think long and hard about where you want to go. In reality, this means defining what your goals and objectives...

How job-hunting has changed in the last 20 years May30

How job-hunting has changed in the last 20 years

Looking for a job? How many applications have you sent so far? 5? 20? 493? Not so long ago–let’s say less than 20 years ago–it wasn’t uncommon to open up a newspaper and go straight to the jobs section, find a job and apply by phone or mail. Or even more common was to simply know someone important enough to get you an interview or a job without even applying.     Although you could still go buy a newspaper and try to look for jobs there, it’s not quite the smartest thing to do. Yes, there are job boards on newspaper websites, but it’s much more efficient to look elsewhere. But the second 90s job-hunting strategy is still very alive nowadays, under a different name: networking.     Yes, the ultimately cool NETWORKING. Networking is a cool-kids name that someone invented for a practice that’s existed since forever. The ancient Greeks had marketplaces called “agoras”, where people such as politicians, businessmen or philosophers got together, greeted friends and enjoyed casual business lunches. The influential French held salon meetings, where great philosophical discussions took place. You even “network” when you’re hanging out watching football and drinking a cold beer. The only difference is that, now, it’s much easier to network globally with tools like LinkedIn, Twitter, and even emails.     Though what is the price that we had to pay for such convenience? Nowadays you can send 20 applications in less than an hour (if they all use the same platform), and then you get to spent your time doing other, more interesting activities. But the price? The price we pay is employer “pickiness”. It is estimated that about 250 applications are received for every corporate job opening. If you want to work...