So you want to be an entrepreneur… Sep29

So you want to be an entrepreneur…

What is it about the internet that fuels our dreams of upward mobility?What is it that makes us who we are?The internet amazes us because it connects us in a previously-unimaginable way. It allows us flash communication and increases our business reach. Talltales of overnight stars and instant millionaires stir the loins of lustful and ambitious neighbors. But why is that? What really motivates some to wade backwards while the rest of us continue with the flow? The Institution of Engineering and Technology claims the top reasons for wanting to be an entrepreneur include:  Money (to state it bluntly) External Recognition Independence Self-satisfaction and fulfillment   Indeed, even members of the Young Entrepreneur Council–an exclusive organization made up of the world’s most successful young entrepreneurs–stated that their motives for pursuing ephemeral wisps of entrepreneurial madness spring from similar desires. It’s an amusing ride full of scares and dips and downs and little frills, but if you persevere, that feeling of proudly profound accomplishment will be yours. You don’t have to be a genius or well-off from the start; you only need to bite down, train your attitude, practice mind-bending spoons, and hold on until it’s time to jump ship or make landfall.   Dare yourself to take that first small step, and go from there.   So why do you do it? What pulls you out of bed every morning, and puts a bounce in your barefooted step? And in honor of this Monday, the traditional start to the traditional workweek, here’s an adaptation of the famous poem “So you want to be a writer…”...

10 Smart Ways to Make Money Online

  Last time I wrote about whether or not an intensive workday is a possibility. In follow-up, let’s assume that you have mastered the art of productive batching and single-minded concentration. You are a well-oiled cog in the sea of fast-moving and disparate company body parts. However, you still earn a bum wage. Or you’re an underpaid intern who rallies to the idea of being a Millennial entrepreneur. Or you may even be on the lookout for an additional revenue stream to add to your ever-revolving portfolio. In any case, the fact remains that you want to take advantage of the great unknown and catch a piece of the internet pie for yourself. Many lists detail ideas on how to make money online. It’s a popular subject. So why rehash what has already been stabbed to death many times over? Because I’ve walked around the block hand-in-hand with these online lists. Some of the suggestions work; others belie the point of highly productive online work.     These are 10 SMART ways to make money online:   1. Start your own niche website You have the potential to start your own website for whatever reason. However, in this ever-expanding universe, it makes sense to focus on one particular subject. Transform yourself into that big fish in the small subsection of the pond. Besides, the more tightly-focused your website content, the more relevant the Google Adsense ads you’re going to put on it, and the more likely you’ll convince one of your readers to click on them.   2. Make your own themed Youtube videos Again, we return to the idea of revolving revenue from advertisements. This time, however, you’re not creating a full website from the ether but rather sharing your unique content on...

Improve productivity by writing your notes and not typing them Sep05

Improve productivity by writing your notes and not typing them

I have a secret. A grossly underestimated secret. It isn’t a hush-hush type of thing, really. It’s actually a well-known phenomenon that researchers are still trying to figure out. It’s this: I learn better by actually physically writing down notes and lists than by typing them up. Truthfully, many a fellow student and co-worker has no idea that typing up notes and such actually decrease their overall productivity and retention rates. A while back, I tried to go fully digital, but that kind of relationship with my e-devices broke down real quick. You see, I’d dutifully type up my notes to remember them better and make them more portable, but then I would completely and utterly forget that I’d made them in the first place. Which defeats the purpose, I know. So why is it that the traditional way of writing trumps the digital process? The answer is simple and somewhat full of common sense reasoning: your ability to learn and later recall information is related to your level of cerebral engagement at the moment of learning. Or, in other words, the better your brain pays attention, the better you’ll remember the information afterwards. The idea truly isn’t that novel, if you think about it. Scientists have known for over 20 years that intense emotions cause your brain to better record an event for later playback. Your amygdala–in this case–activates more strongly in reaction to stimuli that involve the nervous system. In a similar manner, multiple studies indicate that physically writing with a pen engages the brain in a way that results in better memory recall. How can event-specific emotion-recall be related to physical writing and memory, you ask? Look at it this way: when you touch a pen or pencil, you’re involvingĀ  countless...